Moments in Time: A Multi-Media Historical Experience
Written & Performed by Laurie Fischer
North Kildonan Community Players - Winnipeg, MB
V.12 - Asper Centre for Theatre and Film (U of W) 
Like grains of sand through an hourglass, so pass our lives.
Each grain, a moment of time creating our past, our present and our future.
But there are moments that cause the flow of sand to stop.
Moments when, suddenly, our everyday lives come to a complete standstill.
These are the "moments in time" which for the rest of our lives
we will remember where we were, what we were doing and who we were with.
Join us for a historical multi-media journey through these moments!

Cast:
Laurie Fischer: Narrator Mark Essenburg:Technical Stage Manager Alanna Essenburg: Stage Hand

 
Show Info:
60 Mins
Tickets: $10

Audience:
General
No Warnings
Thu July 20 7:00 PM
Sat July 22 1:45 PM
Mon July 24 8:00 PM
Tue July 25 12:00 PM
Wed July 26 2:45 PM
Sat July 29 11:15 PM
Sun July 30 3:30 PM

Moments in Time: A Multi-Media Historical Experience

North Kildonan Community Players—Asper Centre (U of W)

This troupe got an appropriate venue here at the U of W since this show is not a show, but a lecture. As a reviewer, I think my job here is to critique the lecture, as opposed to reviewing the show.

The premise of the lecture lies on selecting monumental moments in time that changed the world. Each moment comes with a brief description and discussion on how it impacted the world. A screen scrolls pictures of memorable events and people in the background, and players move blocks in the foreground, which at times, relate to the topic.

Although the lecture refers to world events, the topics are very American-centric with a smattering of Canadian content. There was nothing outside Canada-US until near the end of the lecture. While the downing of the Berlin wall was an important world event, many consider Princess Diana’s death more of a matter of tabloid news than world-impact.

Neil Armstrong’s words are of course, immortalised—and they were appropriate for the time. However, in today’s discourse, if you want to discuss equality and fairness, sexist terms like “man” (referring to the species) and “mankind” should not be part of the discussion.

Accompanying photos depicted people like Mohandas Gandhi and Nelson Mandela, but there was no discussion on either of them. Some of the “moments” they chose were very curious. Sure, the Nixon scandal and the Lennon assassination were memorable, but were they more important than the signing of the Armistice? The Tiananmen Square massacre? The Bay of Pigs? The dissolution of the USSR? Sorry, but not in the same league. And Buddy Holly’s death is a worldwide notorious moment? Please.

As for the lecture itself, the speaker delivers the message animatedly and well, but needs some serious refining. Basic public speaking 101 dictates that you should not lean on the podium. There were also a considerable number of misspeaks, especially considering that he read from a binder. There’s some much-needed polishing here.

This was an OK lecture but a better choice of topics could have make this a moment in time of the Fringe.

Ray Yuen